Is Congress about to remove one of the most effective tools in our counterterrorism toolbox? They will if a bill introduced by Arizona Sen. John McCain (R) that is making its way through the Senate is passed. The legislation proposes indefinite military detention for all terrorism suspects, whether they?re picked up in East Africa or east Los Angeles, and essentially removes federal prosecution as a viable option.
For all the technological progress made during the last century, protesting today still involves doing exactly what people did a hundred years ago: marching, chanting, and waving (mainly) handmade signs. Some take the solidarity with their forefathers even further by also sleeping in tents and showering infrequently...
Anwar al-Awlaki may be dead, but the two terrorists in Yemen most deserving of U.S. retribution remain alive and well. They are Jamal al-Badawi and Fahd al-Quso, two al-Qaeda members who in 2000 confessed to U.S. investigators their roles in the bombing of the USS Cole, which occurred 11 years ago today. The attack on the U.S. Navy destroyer, at the Yemeni port city of Aden, left 17 sailors dead and almost 40 injured...
U.S. interrogators turned an al Qaeda terrorist into a human polygraph machine while investigating the bombing of the USS Cole -- an attack whose eleventh anniversary is today. What has since happened to that operative helps explain why we're still fighting al Qaeda today...
One of the least publicized things about al Qaeda is that for every cunning terrorist mastermind, there are other members who would merit coverage on a show similar to "America's dumbest criminals..."