What alarms investigators the most about these incidents — which were just a handful of the terrorist incidents across Europe this year — is that none appears to have been the work of returning ISIS fighters, and most had little to do with the group itself.
Abdulmajid Abakarov, a 12-year-old boy from Russia's troubled province of Dagestan, had not seen his mother in three years. Zagidat Abakarova, 34, and her two younger children were "forcibly held" in Syria by her husband, who had joined ISIL, Russian officials said.
There was the man who drove a van down a crowded pedestrian walk in Barcelona, killing 14. The terrorist who stole a truck and careened it into a crowd of people at a Bastille Day celebration in Nice, killing 86. The attack on a Berlin Christmas market that killed 12.
New York’s deadly terror attack on Tuesday bore the hallmarks of previous attacks in Europe that used vehicles to mow down pedestrians in London, Nice, Berlin and Stockholm. And like the incident in the Swedish capital in April, the suspect hailed from Uzbekistan ...
As Daesh’s (ISIS) self-proclaimed “caliphate” crumbles under an international military pounding, European governments are grappling with a shared problem: what to do with returning militants and their families. Governments from London to Berlin have made ...