The name and face of former FBI special agent Ali Soufan have only recently become known to the public, but to those inside the U.S. government Soufan has long been something of a legend. He conducted the most effective and fruitful interrogations of Al Qaeda suspects during the war on terrorism, and save for some inexplicable failures by the CIA, he and his team might well have prevented 9/11...
The testimony was explosive. Here was a man on the front lines of the battle against al-Qaeda, announcing that the CIA's brutal interrogations were "ineffective, slow and unreliable." Now Soufan has fired another salvo, in a memoir titled "The Black Banners." The book goes behind the scenes of some of the most important terrorism interrogations since 9/11...
He has reason to feel strongly, not just because several of his most important cases were cut short by the CIA's insistence on turning to 'enhanced interrogation,' but also because his subsequent evidence in front of a Senate committee led to an inter-agency struggle which contributed to him leaving the bureau he loved.
I'm the person whose team came closest to preventing 9/11, but when I tried to put my story out there, I ran up against the censors in the CIA. I wrote a book that describes the history of the war against al-Qaeda, including how the CIA missed its chance to derail the 9/11 plot by refusing to share information with the FBI. As far as 9/11 is concerned, I know what I'm talking about because I'm a former FBI supervisory special agent and interrogator...
To become the top Al-Qaeda interrogator he bluffed significant intelligence from major Al-Qaeda operatives. His secret: Knowledge. Knowledge of the enemy to be exact...