Ali Soufan put the pieces together in 1997, long before most other American investigators had even heard the name of the wealthy Saudi radical: Osama bin Laden was an enormous terrorist threat. For the next eight years, and with accelerated urgency after 9/11, Soufan traveled the world, from the smoldering wreckage of the U.S.S. Cole in Yemen to the interrogation rooms at Guantanamo Bay, teasing out crucial clues to the shadowy structure of Al Qaeda. When word came that bin Laden was finally dead, Soufan was at home in New York, assembling something nearly as puzzling: a swing set for his newborn twin sons.
Washington (CNN) -- Within hours of President Barack Obama's announcement that Osama bin Laden had been killed, politics entered the fray. A small but vocal group of Republicans including former Bush administration officials began claiming that information obtained from waterboarding and other now-prohibited enhanced interrogation techniques led to the successful assault on bin Laden's compound in Pakistan...
Mark Fallon appeared on May 3, 2011,on Lawrence O'Donnell's MSNBC show, "The Last Word," discussing Bin Laden's death and claims about how intelligence was gained that led to the arrest.
It should happen with little or no fanfare, but it will still represent a moment that some thought might never occur: federal prosecutors in Manhattan are expected to file court papers this week that will formally ask a judge to dismiss all charges against Osama bin Laden...
In the early hours (Pakistan time) of May 2, 2011, a date which will likely become as iconic as 9/11 - President Barack Obama announced that Osama bin Laden was killed near the Pakistani capital of Islamabad, following a targeted operation by U.S. Special Forces. These may have been deployed from Tarbela Ghazi - an area close to bin Laden's villa in Abbottabad - used by U.S. Marines. The impact of this action will be profound. The shockwaves will play...